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Saudi Heritage Commission event celebrates ancient Rakah

The Heritage Commission is holding an event to celebrate ancient Rakah, with historical reenactments, guided tours, archaeological experts and handicrafts.

Once a major trading spot, some 1,500 years ago, the area takes its name from an indigenous tree species that once flourished there. The sandy environment was also once under the sea and shells can be found still glued to the rocks.

 

Visitors learned about dates’ importance in ancient times as well as how merchants made and traded date syrup with locals. (AN photo)

 

Many of the guides are female archaeology graduates from Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, formerly known as the University of Dammam.

Wala Al-Nafaiai, who co-founded Dam Studio, a local business that specializes in handmade goods made of cow and camel hide, said she was looking forward to showing off her products to visitors.

FASTFACTS

● Once a major trading spot, some 1,500 years ago, the Rakah area in Dammam takes its name from an indigenous tree species that once flourished there.

● The sandy environment was also once under the sea and shells can be found still glued to the rocks.

“We want our customers to enter our space, either in our booth at the event this week or our studio location, and in just a short time be able to produce something customized to take home, she told Arab News.

 

Visitors learned about dates’ importance in ancient times as well as how merchants made and traded date syrup with locals. (AN photo)

 

“Instead of going to a restaurant, we want you to spend the time to have an experience, produce something practical and learn skills you can utilize later.”

Al-Nafaiai said she was delighted with how many people had taken part in the workshops she provided at her booth.

It seems many (people) enjoy customizing something that they feel connected to once they make it with their own hands.

Wala Al-Nafaiai, Dam Studio co-founder

“It was so crowded … I was surprised that there were more adults than children who wanted to join in, although the craft was very simple,” she said.

“It seems many (people) enjoy customizing something that they feel connected to once they make it with their own hands. And that is our goal and the goal of the Heritage Commission who invited us to join this successful event.”

 

Visitors learned about dates’ importance in ancient times as well as how merchants made and traded date syrup with locals. (AN photo)

 

Visitors were also able to learn about the importance of dates to the community in ancient times and how local people would make and trade date syrup with visiting merchants.

Organized in cooperation with the Sharqiya Development Authority, the festival ends on Tuesday. For more information, visit heritage.moc.gov.sa or @mocheritage.